Money Talks Blog by Oxford Planning Group

At Oxford Planning Group we hope you will be amazed by a unique experience. In our two blogs we will include periodic information and viewpoints that we hope you will find interesting. Seasoned Savers is geared towards financially experienced individuals. OPG Basics is aimed towards younger generations just starting out.

We welcome your thoughts and ideas, if you'd like to learn more about any specific area, send us an email at kirsten@oxfordplanning.com

Tax Returns Completed – What Now?

By now, many of you have completed your 2018 Tax Returns or have filed for an extension.  Were you surprised by any results of your tax return?  Did you get a larger than expected refund?  Did you owe more taxes than expected?

Now’s the time to make sure you are in good shape for 2019.

Here are a few things to review:

Review all your retirement plan options.

                If you are in a higher tax bracket, maximizing your retirement plan deferrals may be a benefit to minimize taxes.  Also, make sure you are taking full advantage of any free money from employer matching.

Do you have an HSA option?

                HSA plans can be used to pay for medical expenses but can also grow tax deferred to help pay for medical expenses in retirement, unlike an FSA account. After age 65, withdrawals do not have to be used solely for medical expenses. The money deposited into an HSA account also avoids Social Security & Medicare Taxes. It’s estimated that at retirement, individuals will likely have over $260,000 in out-of-pocket medical expenses and even higher for couples.

Are you going to turn 70 ½ this year?

                If you are turning 70 ½ and will be taking a Required Minimum Distribution, make sure you have planned for the additional income and that you are adjusting your tax deductions so that you don’t have a bad surprise at the end of 2019.

Self-employed?

                Make sure to coordinate with your Tax Advisor and Financial Planner.  You may have some extra deductions that are not available to someone that is not self-employed.

Education Plans.

                If you are helping to save for children's or grandchildren's education, make sure that you are taking advantage of the deductions and deferral opportunities available.  Make sure to review eligibility limits to determine if you are eligible for any Maryland tax benefits. 

Is your investment portfolio tax efficient?

                Depending on when you need income from your portfolio and your current tax bracket, be sure to review whether your portfolio is set up to best benefit you on an after-tax basis.  During the growth years of your portfolio, capital gains taxes are typically less expensive than income tax brackets.  Compare tax free bonds to taxable bonds to see which gives you the best after tax benefit.  Equity markets have been experiencing regular volatility lately.  This create opportunities for tax loss harvesting that may help to reduce taxes from your portfolio. 

 

These are just a few ideas to help you reduce your taxes and to be more tax efficient.  Financial planning involves a lot of moving parts.  Oxford Planning Group is here to help our clients simplify their finances and to help increase our clients’ long-term financial success.

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What's Your Retirement Factor?

Are you prepared for Retirement?

Years ago, it was not uncommon to estimate that at retirement you might need 75% to 80% of your current expenses to survive and enjoy your retirement years. However, this number can be misleading for a few reasons.

  • There are many differences in households and their income needs.
  • People are living longer today than our parents' generations.
  • Health care costs have skyrocketed and could play a much higher part of future expenses than previously expected.

It's important to think about your own expected longevity so that you can properly and safely estimate how long your income will need to continue in retirement. For example, for those fortunate enough to have good health, traveling more frequently may be a desire and needs to be planned for accordingly.

Questions to Ask Yourself

  • What are your current spending needs to pay your bills and have some fun?
  • How will your spending needs change overtime?
    • Will your mortgage be paid off? 
    • Will you need the insurance coverages you may own at retirement?
    • Will your healthcare costs go up or down?
    • Maybe if you're no longer working, your dry-cleaning bills will go down.

Every household is different and unique. Regardless of your personal situation it’s important to sit down and review your current expenses and see what will apply when you are retired.  We generally calculate everything in today's dollars to make it easier to compare but know that inflation will make those actual numbers higher at retirement.

Let's say you determine that your retirement expenses will be ten percent less than your current expenses.  That’s a factor of 0.9 (or 90% of current expenses).

After you have a good handle on what your expenses may look like in the future, it’s important to look at all your income sources to determine if you have adequate income to support those expenses.  Income may include:

  • Pensions, social security, retirement earnings from employment while retired
  • Income from investments or any other source of income that applies to you

Hopefully when you review your income and then deduct your expected expenses, you’re left with a positive cash flow.  If not- then it’s time to look deeper:

  • Run scenarios on how long your money should last
  •  What expenses could be further reduced

You will want to be sure you are able to meet your retirement expenses and hopefully enjoy life and have some fun along the way.

Oxford Planning Group works with our clients to help determine these numbers.  It’s important to use conservative numbers in estimating portfolio returns, taxes and other estimates so that future predictions and estimates are based on realistic values.  As always, we are here to help.  We are "Focused on your Tomorrows".

 

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What’s your Financial Legacy?

When you were in the early years of your financial experiences, you may have learned lessons from your parents or other relatives.  You may have also had a teacher or mentor that gave you valuable life lessons that helped you financially.  If you did have that person in your life you are very lucky.

Hopefully throughout your life you have now formed a value system around your finances.

Legacy planning is a broad topic and can include how you want your money used in the future, how you hope the next generation will use or think about money and the best ways to tax efficiently pass on your money. Additionally, legacy planning can include protective measures that further control the money after your death. There are many options to think about.

Now it’s time to ask yourself what you want your financial legacy to look like. 

Have you saved enough, or do you live within reasonable means so that you will be financially stable throughout your life?  Will you have any money left at the end of your life?  Who would you like to benefit from any money you have left?  A family member?  A charity?  A cherished friend?

As you look forward and begin planning how your money will last and possibly benefit another generation, there are many variables that need to be reviewed.  How will you invest the money?  What is the best way to position your money to minimize taxes?  During your lifetime you will have income taxes and then when you pass on your money, the beneficiary may be faced with income taxes.  Proper planning can provide useful strategies that will help maximize what you have available to use or what you will have available to pass on to the next generation.  

Historical statistics show that a huge amount of wealth is lost as it is passed from one generation to the next.  This is often due to lack of knowledge in those receiving the money as well as frequent requests for loans or a “helping hand” from friends and family of the beneficiary.

If you are concerned about this, there are ways to protect your money, both now and after your death. Using trusts and other structures can provide more limited access to future money and hopefully better long-term usefulness of the money you leave.

What’s your Legacy?  Most of us will never be a famous politician, actor/actress or other famous person but each of us has a chance to make the world a better place and leave our own Legacy. 

It starts with you.  What are your values?  What are your money values?  

Within each of our own families we have an opportunity to help mold the next generation.  Do your children know your values and what you feel the best use of money should be?  You should share your thoughts with them.  

Are you utilizing the tools available to maximize your Legacy?  There are many types of investments and insurance products, as well as different types of trust and business arrangements that can help maximize your lifetime Legacy.  

Do you have charitable goals?  Are you set up to be able to leave money to charity in the most tax beneficial ways?

Need help?  Let Oxford Planning Group help build your legacy.  

 

 

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Spring Clean your Finances with Oxford Planning

 

 

It’s officially Spring and there's no better time to get organized and clean things up. Simplifying and organizing your finances can also help in reducing stress and creating greater positive energy. 

Household finances are typically one of the most stressful areas of all households and relationships.  

Debts, uncertainty about employment, lack of emergency reserves, worry about investments, unexpected expenses and uncertainty of longer-term goals can also create elevated stress levels. 

At Oxford Planning Group, we take both simple and complex financial situations and help create solutions to overcome challenges and achieve financial objectives. Our clear and simple to use online solutions help you track all your finances in a secure, interactive dashboard and allows you to see your financial life in action.

Do you have a plan to achieve your ongoing goals?  Do you have too many accounts (banking or investment), too many credit cards or no core plan for long term achievement of goals?  Not being able to easily track your debts and investments can create greater financial risk.  Additionally, it’s much more difficult to achieve financial goals if you can't easily track your current situation and progress. 

The first step in Spring Cleaning your finances is to create a summary of everything you have.  What do you own and what do you owe? 

  • Things you own can include property, home(s), investment accounts, bank accounts, collections, or anything else of value. 
  • Things you owe include any debts on any property such as your mortgage, a car or other property where a loan was used to purchase an item.   

Next, do you know where everything is? And very importantly - does your spouse or partner know?

  • If you have a medical emergency or an auto accident, do you and your spouse or partner have easy access to your benefits for those policies? 
  • Have you had your insurance policies reviewed recently to see if they are up to date and providing the best benefits for your needs and costs?
  • Check your credit report
  • Get rid of clutter by scanning in documents that you don't need to keep in hard copy.  Store them in a secured (and backed up) computer or your personal vault (part of our secure online solutions). 

So - what’s creating worry or stress for you?  Let Oxford help you build a plan and simplify your finances.  Let's make sure everything is up to date and that you know where everything is.  It’s time to relax and enjoy spring. 

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What's Your Home's Basis?

white house under maple trees

As I work with many of my retiree clients, it’s common for them to consider selling their current homes.  The reasons for this are numerous and may include buying in a dream location, downsizing, moving to lower taxed states, moving closer to their children and moving to retirement communities.

What You Need to Know

The higher the tax basis of your home, the less you will be taxed at the time of sale.  Typically, any amount you roll over to a new home won't be taxed, but any gain over your basis that is not reinvested in your new home may be subject to taxation.  Also, if you inherited your home from a parent, your basis may be based on the value at the time of death of your parent.

Hopefully over the years you have saved some of the receipts from loan documents, loan refinancing documents and home improvements.  Also, don't forget to include information on any previous home's value you have rolled into your current home.  Your basis will typically include the home's original purchase price, but also may include certain fees and expenses that were paid at closing. 

Here are a few things (and this is not meant to be all inclusive) that can further increase or decrease your homes basis:

Decrease

  • Home office depreciation
  • Insurance proceeds from an insured loss
  • Money received to give an easement on your property

Increase

  • Additions or Improvements to your home
  • Improvements to prolong the life of your home
  • Government Assessments to add street lighting, curbs etc.
  • Repairs after hurricane or fire damage
  • Legal fees to defend title

 

Its always best to think about your home's basis well before you need the numbers.  After a sale, when it's time to file tax returns, everything gets rushed.  Make sure you plan ahead so you can have accurate facts and help to minimize your taxes.  We recommend that you check with your accountant to confirm any details related to your home's basis.

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Emergency Medical Situations at Home or Work

Brown and White Bear Plush Toy

Today's blog is a little different.  It’s not finance related, but it’s certainly about your welfare and the welfare of your friends and family.  Today we had the opportunity to participate in a "Stop the Bleed" course at our office.  This course was designed to help train bystanders how to stop life threatening bleeding while waiting for emergency responders to arrive. So, because I'm in the first aid mindset, I thought I'd write a short piece on situations you may encounter at work or home. My purpose in this blog is to give you an idea of what you may encounter, and the types of training that are useful to be prepared for these situations.  This blog is not intended in any way as specific instruction of what to do in these situations. It is just my take away from the training I have received. 

Any number of emergencies can occur during your average day no matter where you work or what you do for a living. Here are a few (by no means a complete list) of the types of emergencies you may encounter and what may be needed.

The first thing to do for any emergency is to call 911 or direct someone to call for you if emergency treatment is needed.  Additionally, do you have emergency numbers posted around your home or office where easily found?

Unconscious person

  •  CPR training can be lifesaving in this event.  Red Cross offers classes all over the nation. If there is an AED available at your location, do you know where it is and how to use it? An AED can be invaluable in saving a victim's life and greatly increase the percentage of survival over not having an AED. 

 Cuts or injuries.

  • A First Aid Kit should be available at your home or office.  A good first aid kit may help save someone's life in the event of an emergency or could help make a less severe injury under control more quickly. The Stop the Bleed class we took had some recommended items for a bleeding control kit.

Allergic Reactions

  • Life threatening allergies are very common. Chances are you know someone who has one. Try to be aware of friends or family members that have allergies and see if they have their own EpiPen. In the event of a serious allergic reaction someone can lose consciousness before being able to alert someone where their Epipen is. If you have your own EpiPen, it may be a good idea to alert those at work or at home where you keep it in the event of an emergency. Many CPR classes include a portion about how to use these.

Choking

  • Choking is another common occurrence.  This may occur at your home, office or while you are out at a restaurant.  Most CPR courses teach the skills needed to help a choking victim.  Such measures can be lifesaving and are easy to learn.

Stroke

  • Again, a good CPR course teaches how to determine signs of a stroke.  Getting immediate emergency care can be critical to both survival and better outcomes for the victim.

 

There are of course many more situations that can occur, but these are some of the most common ones.  Additionally, each of the above has relatively easy sources of training available to be considered.  In all cases any person aiding a victim should always consider their own safety first.

The American Red Cross, some local Fire Stations and other private organizations offer courses in the above emergency procedures and many more.  We recommend CPR training for everyone because it is such a valuable skill to have and the classes only take a couple of hours.

Red Cross CPR Classes

https://www.redcross.org/take-a-class?scode=PSG00000E017&cid=generator&med=cpc&source=google&gclid=Cj0KCQiAzePjBRCRARIsAGkrSm749F4E89rSkgfPraEU8VFMK6HYnLe9stqMubnkWJapV5kFKI0QgBwaApX3EALw_wcB&gclsrc=aw.ds

Stop the Bleed Classes

https://cms.bleedingcontrol.org/class/search

 

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Credit Card Reward Miles – Not always What they Appear to Be

 

Many of us use credit cards with reward point systems.  These programs offer discounts, air miles, cash rewards, gift cards, magazine subscriptions, discount gas and numerous other options.

Do you really know if you're getting the best deal on your reward points versus other options available?

When reviewing reward point systems, it’s important to review the rewards in terms of the amount of dollars of benefit received for the dollars that you spent.  This is generally not how these point systems are reported.  In fact, with one card you might get triple points for every dollar spend and for another card you might get double points for every dollar spent.  At first glance, the triple points look like the better deal.  The reality is that the dollar value of both rewards points might be identical.

So how do you know what’s best?

First, review how many points you get for each dollar spent.  Some plans give different points for different types of spending (dining out, groceries, gas, etc).  If that’s the case, you may have to figure out an average amount spend and what points you received for that.

Next, review how those points convert into your rewards.

We all have different things we like, so limit your comparison to only those things you would normally use.  If you travel a lot, look at air miles/tickets.  If you shop at amazon, target, staples, see if they offer a gift card.  Review what cash reward options are.  You'd think they all converted to the same dollar amount, but generally they do not.

We’ve seen cases where a cash reward option was for example $100, but that same points reward in a gift card offered was worth $200.  That’s double the value and could have easily been missed.

Now that you better understand how your rewards points work, don’t forget to compare to other cards you have or to other offers you get occasionally.  Make sure to give yourself the best dollar value rewards possible.  It’s in your best interest.

As always, we are here to help.  If you have any questions let us know.

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Market Volatility, the Government Shut Down and Your Financial and Retirement Goals

 

As many of us watch current market volatility as well as US and World news, it may seem daunting to project into the future.  Will you reach your savings goals on time?  What will retirement look like?  First, remember that the markets generally operate in cycles.  Market timing rarely works.  Long term planning and adequate diversification are generally your friends in these challenging markets.  Remember too, that past performance does not guarantee future performance, but it is often all we have to estimate into the future. 

So how do you best plan in a down market?  One of the most important aspects is to continue to commit to ongoing savings and controlling expenses.  Continuing to invest in a down market is a form of Dollar Cost Averaging which has generally been shown to enhance long term returns.  Goals can't be reached if you stop saving for the future, so this ongoing commitment continues to build your investment portfolio and during a down market, allows you to buy investment shares at cheaper prices.

So, don’t panic and stop saving just because the markets are down.  Remember that long term savings commitment should pay off.

If you are a government employee or a company affected by the government shut down, you may be experiencing some current cash flow squeeze.  If that’s the case, do the best you can.  Cut back on expenses where possible, keep up as much of your savings as possible, and if any cut backs are required, get back to normal as quickly as you can after the crisis is over.  After the cash flow crunch has subsided, consider continuing to operate under a reduced expense environment until your savings goals are caught up.  This commitment will really pay off into the future.

We are here to help, problem solve and to discuss ideas to keep you on track. 

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Happy Holidays 2018

Happy Holidays from all of us at Oxford Planning Group. 

We wish you peace and time spent surrounded by loved ones.  

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A Time for Giving Thanks

Happy Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving - a time for gratitude, memories and for caring about others. At Oxford Planning, we have much to be thankful for.  We are blessed with a great family, friends, clients, associates and a wonderful community with so many great people. 

We hope you enjoy the spirit of this holiday.  Additionally, we hope that your favorite team wins, that you enjoy watching the Thanksgiving Day parade and that your favorite dog wins the Westminster dog show.

Thank you all for your continued confidence in our firm.  We are here to support your needs and you always come first to us.

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A Veterans Day Message

Today we stand tall and proud in honor of our Veterans who have served tirelessly and bravely to maintain and protect the freedoms that we are accustomed to. 

 

At Oxford Planning Group, we are focused on our client’s futures and we thank our Veterans for making these futures possible.  We strive to take advantage of the gifts we have been afforded and work hard every day to help our clients achieve their goals and to make their best financial decisions. 

This recent election day will be remembered by many as highly contested political races.  These political races reflect the passion and diverse beliefs held by our countries’ citizens.  Now as the election has ended, it’s our hope that we will support our leaders as best we can, continue to push forward for what we believe in and stay active in our communities. 

After all, the freedoms we live with reflect the hard work and service of our Veterans.  Outside of the United States, many are not so fortunate, do not have as much freedom and live in countries plagued by corruption. 

So today, on Veterans Day, let’s remember to celebrate our veterans, both Democrats and Republicans, who have served our great country.  We thank you for your service.  

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Should You Use Extra Cash to Invest or Pay Down Your Mortgage?

 

 

It seems like such a simple question, but whether to pay off your mortgage or to build up an investment account may not be a simple answer.   

First, all mortgages come with a minimum payment.  Either Principal and interest, or in some cases interest only.  Either way, there is a minimum amount that must be paid each month.  The question of whether to invest or to pay off your mortgage only applies to any amount you have available above your minimum payment. 

We are currently in a rising interest rate environment.  Rates currently remain fairly low, but as they rise further, it’s important to decide at what interest rate investing any extra payments no longer makes sense.  Generally, a mortgage rate of 6% or lower may make sense to invest the extra payments instead of paying down your mortgage.  This is based on the 6% rate netting to an even a lower rate based on an individual's tax bracket, deductions for mortgage interest and an assumption that over a long-term period the equity market has exceeded this lower net rate.  There is in fact no one size fits all answer for everyone. 

Risk tolerance is a big consideration.  Let's say you have a mortgage and you are making minimum payments.  Over time, you build up an investment account of $50,000 that would have otherwise been used to pay down you mortgage.  How would you feel in the event of a market correction?  It's critical that you think of these types of results in deciding whether to invest or not.  Truthfully, most people really don’t know how they would feel in the event of a market correction unless they have experienced it. 

For this strategy to be successful, your portfolio will need to have a net return (after taxes on dividends and capital gains) that is higher than your mortgage interest rate after your mortgage tax deduction. 

Calculating the math related to this transaction is only a part of this decision.  Evaluating how you feel about having a higher mortgage and money at risk or having an ever-decreasing mortgage is just as important. 

Oxford Planning Group, LLC can help you walk through this process.  What's right for you?  We are here to help.  We are Focused on Your Tomorrows.

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The Benefits of Downsizing Your Home

Many life events can create a need to downsize your home. As families grow older and children move out of the house or area, parents often want to live in a smaller home or a home closer to their children and grandchildren. No matter the reason, downsizing has the potential to provide a simpler and lower-maintenance lifestyle. As you think about downsizing your home, consider these benefits:

Financial – If downsizing your home pre-retirement, lowering your mortgage payment by purchasing a smaller home could increase the funds that you save toward retirement or pay toward outstanding debt. Also, by selling your home and downsizing, you may be able to put down a large down payment or purchase a smaller home with cash, thus reducing or eliminating your mortgage payment.

Utility Savings – Downsizing not only has the potential to lower your mortgage payment; it can also lower home expenses. By purchasing a smaller home, you will likely use less electricity, resulting in a lower power bill. Additionally, purchasing a home with a smaller yard, or a condo with no yard, can save on the expenses of landscape maintenance and pest control. 

Less upkeep – In addition to lower energy bills, a smaller home means a smaller area to clean and furnish. With less property, you will most likely have less yard work as well as fewer repairs and renovations. This will hopefully provide you with more time for your family and the things you love.

While downsizing your home has many benefits, make sure to run the numbers. Look at costs associated with selling the primary home, which may include preparing the house for sale, the real estate agent’s commission, moving costs and the cost of the new home. Also, while moving into a smaller home usually means a smaller mortgage payment, location and cost of living can have an effect.

This blog provided courtesy of David Koonce NMLS# 480428 of Fairway Independent Mortgage Corporation.  Feel free to reach out to David if you have any mortgage needs or questions.  Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  or Call: 410-220-0205or 301-332-3234. 

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Happy Labor Day Weekend! 3 Reasons to make Financial Planning a priority this fall

With summer winding down, now is the time to revisit your long term financial plan and to review them for any necessary adjustments. Touch base with your financial advisor and make sure you’re on the right track to meeting your financial goals.

 

1.      Re-evaluate income and cash flow.  Raises, job changes and unexpected home costs are just a few of the factors that impact your income and cash flow.  Re-evaluate current income to plan monthly expenses and savings as well as making the most advantageous retirement savings decisions. Monitor your spending patterns and current budgeting practices within the scope of your long- term savings strategy.

2.      Family Security.  This is one of the most important decisions you can make to invest in your family’s financial security.  Examples may include proper insurance coverage and polices in place to reduce or eliminate financial risks when faced with sudden or unexpected loss.  Security may also include starting or re-evaluating college savings plans (planning ahead for your kid’s futures relieves some of the financial burdens and gives them a head start entering college or the workforce.) 

3.       Proactive tax planning.  With the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017, you may need to adjust your tax projections.  By remaining proactive about your tax planning, you will determine how much money you’ll need for upcoming tax payments.  Taxes are such a significant annual expense, it’s important to understand the best strategies to reduce your taxes and avoid expensive mistakes that could cost you.  Effective tax planning allows you to make smarter financial investments, helping save you money in the long run. 

 

Financial planning is ongoing, and we’re here to help!  

 

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Paying off Student Loans - What competes for your dollars?

Like many college graduates, you may now have student loans that are becoming due.

Knowing how to prioritize your payments and other savings can make a big difference to future success. 

It’s not unusual that there are many demands for the money you may have available.  Building emergency reserves, disability insurance, savings for future home purchase, saving for a wedding and funding retirement plans are just a few of the items that commonly compete for dollars as graduates consider how to pay down their student loans. 

Hopefully the student loan is the only debt that you have as you graduate.  If that’s not the case, all your debts should be reviewed collectively. 

We generally recommend putting any extra loan payments towards the loan with the highest interest rate.  But there may be reasons for a different plan of action depending on your individual circumstances. 

So, if you’re just getting started (or you have a child who is just getting started), there’s a lot to think about.

First, know your budget and stick to it.  Basically, live within your paycheck so that you can make better progress toward your goals.  Once you have a solid budget, what’s left?  This is the money you can use to build emergency savings, to fund disability insurance, to take advantage of company retirement plans and to pay off loans.

Now you must figure out how to prioritize.  Disability Insurance should be considered to protect your income.  Outside of this everyone should have emergency reserves to cover unexpected expenses or to cover brief periods of lost pay between jobs or if laid off.  Historically it was common to recommend 4 – 6 months of expenses as a good nest egg to cover the unexpected.  I think this is good initially when you are starting from scratch, but in the future, it may be important to increase this amount.  The economic and market events of 2008 put a strain on many people’s cash reserves and in many cases 4-6 months proved inadequate. 

It’s not uncommon for individuals to consider putting off retirement savings in lieu of reducing debt and building cash reserves.  There are several reasons this should be reconsidered.  First, saving something even if a small amount builds momentum and discipline towards retirement savings.  This can be very important to long term success.  Second, if the employer offers a match, this is free money - and can be an incredible immediate return on any money you save.  If possible, try to contribute enough to get your maximum employer match.  If that’s not possible, do your best and or use future raises to increase your contributions to gain that benefit in the future.

We recognize your first priority is to make your minimum required payment on your student loan.  After that, what’s left?  This is where some percent should go to disability insurance, building emergency savings (maybe more initially) and some percent should take advantage of company retirement plans.  The exact amount to each is a personal choice but always try to make sure you have enough or are building emergency reserves.  Know what your back up plan is if an unexpected event occurs.

 

We hope you find this info helpful.  If you or a family member would like further information, please contact us.  We are focused on your success and are “Focused on Your Tomorrows”.

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401(k) Plan Investing - are you diversified?

 

When handed 401(k) information from an employer, many participants are overwhelmed with the information they are provided.  Ideally, each participant would allocate across a diversified portfolio that best represents their risk tolerance and timeframe until retirement.  Unfortunately, the information provided is often too complicated to make easy decisions. 

This is where a Certified Financial Planner ® can add value.  Trained in retirement planning (and other areas of financial planning), investments, risk management, estate planning and taxes, CFP® practitioners are best qualified to review your overall situation.

Your investment goals for your 401k should be coordinated with any other investments you may hold outside of your 401(k).  If your employer offers matching dollars in your 401(k), you should strive to ensure that you can maximize this benefit.  After all, this is free money and immediately adds to your investment performance before even entering into your investments. 

Personal finance is just that – personal.  Your specific set of facts will often be unique to you.  You may be saving for a home, providing funds for children’s education, reviewing debt consolidation, have unusual medical expenses or any other set of unique circumstances.    

What Should You Be Considering?

What are your long-term goals?

Do you have shorter term goals that need to be coordinated with long term goals?

Have you reviewed your 401(k) plans’ “Summary Plan Document” to make sure you are maximizing your benefit?

Do you understand your risk tolerance and if you are married, does your spouse have a similar or different risk tolerance? 

Do you understand the investments in your retirement account?

Is someone offering to review these investments with you at least annually?

Too often, retirement plan education is full of industry jargon and difficult to understand.  If you have a great understanding of the above questions, you are ahead of the game and probably have a good start to head in the right direction for your retirement planning.  If not, consider consulting a Certified Financial Planner ® who can best provide you with important information to steer you in the right direction. 

Remember, it’s your future! 

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Happy July 4th!

From all of us at Oxford Planning Group, we hope you have a safe and wonderful holiday. 

We are blessed to live in such a wonderful country.

 

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Travel Safely and Securely this summer!

     Summer travel!                                                  

     

We all look forward to getting away from it all. Summer means trips and family time – but don’t forget to take precautions at home and while you’re away to secure physical and digital devices.

At home

Back up all devices either to local storage or cloud services protected by strong encryption. Use password security on all devices and specify a number of failed attempts before lockout. 

Don’t post details of your adventure while you’re away – it’s so exciting to share with everyone, but wait until your adventure is over before sharing.

Physical security

Stolen wallets are a traveler’s nightmare.  Minimize potential dangers by carrying only essential items.  Invest in a money belt or pouch that can be concealed under clothing.

Take photos of all important documents like credit cards and passports and store them in an encrypted format such as a cloud service.  This will give you access to basic forms of identity in the event of theft.

Laptops are vulnerable to theft – consider if you really need to bring one. If you do, it’s best not to have information stored on the device that could be stolen (personal financial info, etc.)

Public Wi-Fi – be careful

-          Be sure your firewall is active and up to date

-          Don’t use banking and shopping sights

-          Email is the most important service to secure – criminals can use your email to reset passwords on other sites

-          For an extra layer of security, CNet suggests subscribing to a public VPN service (it sets up a secure channel between you and sites you connect to, protecting data with strong encryption). Most plans are under $15 a month

 

Security shouldn’t stop the fun – consider it part of your vacation plan to really allow you to unwind!

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Do you have a plan for Long Term Care?

Source: AARP

Do you have a plan for Long Term Care?

As we age, or in the event of a medical event, we may need Long Term Care.  Surprisingly, a large percentage of people have no plan for such an occurrence.  Additionally, many people believe that health insurance or government programs such as Medicare will pay for these needs.  Sadly, that is not the case.  Lack of planning in this area can be a major financial burden for families.  In addition, this lack of planning puts a heavy strain on community and social service programs that are not funded or designed for this purpose.   

In 2017, I was appointed by Governor Hogan to a Task Force on Long Term Care.  The purpose of the Task Force was to make recommendations for better education around Long Term Care.  Unfortunately, many families are unware of what may lie ahead for their Long Term Care needs.  Over 70% of all people will require some form of Long Term Care services in their lifetime.  This may be very short-term care or care lasting the remainder of their lives.  In order that families are better prepared for this, our task force was assigned to review education around the topic and to recommend ways to help people be more prepared.

It all starts with having a plan.  While there are many components of an overall financial plan, this blog focuses on planning for Long Term Care.  So, what’s in a plan? 

This article by Kiplinger “Why Families Need a Plan for Caregiving” discusses some considerations faced when planning for Long Term Care.

First, should you need any kind of care, where do you want to receive that care?  The answer is not the same for everyone, but many people would prefer to receive care in their homes initially.

Questions to consider:

  • Who will provide that care? 
  • Do you have a spouse, children or other relatives or friends that are willing to provide that care? 
  • Are they physically able to provide that care?  (It is one thing for a 200lb stronger man to care for a     more petite spouse, but the reverse may not be physically possible.) 
  • Is your home set up to allow you to be cared for in home? 
  • Do you live on more than one floor or a single floor? 
  • Are your bathrooms handicapped accessible?
  • Or would you prefer to live in a Long-Term Care Facility?

Next, it is important to review what financial resources will be available for Long Term Care. 

  • Long Term Care insurance may be an option, but not everyone will be able to afford this option.  Long Term Care Insurance, if you are eligible, may be purchased to cover part of or most of these care expenses. 
  • Without insurance to cover Long Term Care, there should still be a plan in place for who will care for a yourself or a relative.
  • Additionally, a plan should be in place to decide where that care will occur.  Will you stay in your home?  Will you move in with a relative?  Will you move to a Long Term Care Facility?

 

We recommend beginning planning early.  This will give you the most time to begin saving ahead of time, to review insurance costs and eligibility and to have ongoing discussions with family members.  Whether you need Long Term Care or how much Long Term Care you need will vary greatly from person to person.  In this case, averages don’t always serve you best.  If you are the person who needs full time Long Term Care, you will be grateful if you have a plan in place.

 
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What APPS have your personal information?

This post provided by Howard Tech Advsors

Have you ever signed up or logged in to an app and bypassed creating a new account by using your Facebook account? Most likely, you were in such a rush to create an account with this third party app that you just kept clicking “Ok” and “Next” through the instructions.  When you use your Facebook account to sign up for another app, you are giving that app access to the information in your Facebook account. This can include your friends, your location, your work, your photos, your groups, your birthday, and even your contact information.

If you haven’t reviewed these apps, now is as good a time as ever to look at what apps can access this information.

HOW TO LOOK AT YOUR THIRD PARTY APPS

Once in Facebook, click on the down arrow next to the question mark in the upper righthand corner. Then, click on Settings. In the left, you will see towards the bottom of the list, “Apps.” When you click on “Apps,” you’ll see all of the apps you have permitted access to your Facebook account. By default, “your name, profile picture, cover photo, gender, networks, username, and user id are always publicly available to both people and apps.” (Learn why here.) Some of the apps require this information. You can select what other information you give the apps access to, including your friends list, birthday, education history, hometown, and current city.

CHANGE WHO CAN SEE THE APPS YOU USE

At a minimum, you should edit your “App visibility” settings or who on Facebook can see which apps you use. This is important in protecting your identity, especially if some of your apps have confidential information. If you are searching for vacation rentals on AirBnB, you may not want the “Public” to know you are planning a 2-week vacation to backpack through Europe. You can tighten the security settings to “Only Me.” For apps such as Instagram, you want your friends to see your photos, so you can loosen the visibility settings to “Friends.”

DISCONNECT FROM ANY APPS YOU DON’T USE

This is the easiest and safest practice. If you aren’t using and don’t plan on using it in the near future, simply remove it. In the future, you may be prompted to create an account with the app. Maybe your perspective will differ from before and you’ll be intentional with your app selection.

BE (MORE) IN CONTROL OF YOUR PRIVACY

Nobody really knows where your information goes once you click, “Like,” or connect. Even if you read through the many, many, many pages of every security policy from every app, tool, website, and third party vendor, you still can’t be 100% certain your data isn’t spinning off in to some cosmic database for anyone and everyone to view. Take ownership of your privacy by being intentional with what accounts you create. Anything worth having (access to) takes time and shouldn’t be done hastily.

 

 “What apps have your personal information?” posted by Howard Tech Advisors By: Michelle Pelszynski on March 22, 2018

 

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